RSS

Braised Beef Ribs, in Guinness

17 Nov

(serves 4)
Stout is a good braising beverage because of its rich nutty taste and all the nourishing grains that goes into each pint of it. I experimented with all kinds of flavours to partner stout before I settled on soya sauce. I don’t know if its because both are black, but they match well, resulting in a East-meets-West braised rib recipe, with hints of Korean cuisine and Pub food.
 nb. No reason why you can’t use pork ribs instead of beef ribs if you so desire.
.

Ingredients

  1. Beef Ribs (1000g)
  2. Guinness Stout (1 can)
  3. Leek (chopped, 1.5 cups)
  4. Carrot (1 large)
  5. Garlic (12 cloves)
  6. Oxo Beef Cube (1)
  7. Flour
  8. Honey
  9. Dark Soya Sauce
  10. French Mustard
  11. Cardamon
  12. Tarragon

Preparation

  1. Start by cutting your carrots into thick discs and diagonally slicing your leek into half rings. Peel the garlic into individual cloves.
  2. There is no need for marination. Just trim off any large chunks of fat and then dredge your raw ribs through a few T of flour containing a sprinkle of salt and pepper.
  3. Using a frying pan, sear your ribs in a few T of oil until they are brown on all sides to seal in juices. You should do them a few at a time, without crowding the pan. Arrange the seared beef in a pyrex or casserole dish as shown below.
  4. In the same pan, without washing it, stir fry your leek in a few T of oil on low heat. When the leek softens, turn up the heat and add your can of stout. Make some beef stock using half a cup of hot water and an Oxo cube, and add that in as well.
  5. Preheat your oven to 160oC (320oF),
  6. Continue to simmer until the volume of your braising sauce is reduced by a third. Turn off the heat and finish off the sauce by mixing in 4T of Dark soya sauce, 2t (heaping) of honey, 1t of cardamon, 1t black pepper,  1T of tarragon.
  7. Arrange the carrots and garlic between the ribs and pour your braising sauce over the ribs, making sure the ribs are fully covered. It’s ok if some of the vegetables stick out. Seal the top of your baking vessel snugly with aluminium foil. If it has a cover, use it. Do not poke breathing holes into the foil.
  8. Bake for 1.5 to 2 hours depending on how chunky your ribs are. Remove from the oven and pour all the liquid, plus what is left of the leeks, into a glass or porcelain container.
  9. Place the ribs and carrots back in the oven without any cover for a further 10 minutes to dry out.
  10. Skim away as much of the oil from the gravy as you can and then pour the remainder into a gravy boat. Add 1t each of honey and French mustard and mix well.
  11. The ribs can be served with a healthy dose of soft staple food. Rice, mashed potatoes and polenta are the ones I usually serve with these ribs.

Notes

  • There is dark soya sauce and light soya sauce. This recipe requires the dark variety which is normally used for margination. Japanese soya sauce is ok but you shouldn’t use Chinese light soya sauce which is normally used for seasoning and dipping.
  • The height and size of the baking dish is important and you should pick one which is tall enough to prevent liquid from boiling over. It must also be big enough to accommodate the ribs without stacking them.
  • Don’t skip the flour. It makes its easier to seal the meat when you are browning it and it also adds some body to your final sauce.
  • You may choose to take out the carrots for the final 10 minutes of baking if you like them soft.
  • If you find that all the liquid has boiled off skip step 9 and instead remove all the solids from the baking vessel and add some hot water and scrape the container to create the gravy.
  • For BBQs, bake for just 1 hour and then finish off the cooking over the BBQ fire. The ribs will be too soft for BBQ if you cook them for the full period.
  • If you don’t have cardamon, try using nutmeg instead.
Advertisements
 
Leave a comment

Posted by on November 17, 2009 in A Kobi Original, English, Main Courses, Recipe

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: