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The Dragon King’s Scallop Soup

(serves 8)
The Dragon King’s Scallop Soup is a fancy soup served in Chinese restaurants
carrying all the different tastes of the sea, such as prawn, scallop and crab, in a medley of tiny morsels. The soup uses a lot of different ingredients and involves a fair bit of work, but you would expect that for a soup that is fit for the Dragon King. I’ve worked the recipe such that it can be prepared in a Western kitchen, so you don’t have to worry about any exotic ingredients. With the Chinese New Year just around the corner, this is the perfect time to prepare such an extra special treat for your friends and family

Ingredients

  1. Scallops (500g)
  2. Medium Prawns (1 kg, about 12)
  3. Cooked Crab (1 tub, 8oz or 250g)
  4. Seafood Stock (4 cups)
  5. Eggs (3)
  6. Asparagus (6 spears)
  7. Carrot (1)
  8. Ginger (3 slices)
  9. Hard Beancurd (1 block, 340g)
  10. Straw Mushrooms (250g)
  11. Chinese Wine
  12. Bicarbonate of Soda
  13. Corn Starch

Preparation

  1. Prepare the seafood stock ahead of time in a large pot. See notes below.
  2. Leave the crab meat in a solution of 4T Chinese wine and 2 cups of water. Stir to loosen up the packed meat.
  3. Drain the beancurd block and flip it onto a large porcelain plate. Using a butter (or other toothless) knife divide the block lengthwise into four slices. Flop one slice onto the plate and pushing with the knife at the base of the block carefully move it to a new position, such that there is sufficient space for the next slice to flop down. Move the remaining beancurd again, this time leaving space for the last 2 slices to flop in opposite directions. Cut each slice into cubes without moving them any further.
  4. Deshell and devein your prawns. Dice the meat into small pieces. Mix the white of one egg with a pinch of bicarbonate and 1 flat t of salt. Marinate the prawn in the egg white for 1 hour, then rinse off the egg.
  5. Dice the scallops and soak the pieces in a light brine made up of 2 cups of water and 2t of salt, for twenty minutes.
  6. Peel a carrot and dice it. Dice the mushrooms. Apply a peeler to the lower half of each asparagus spear to remove the fibrous layer and then cut the asparagus into thick slices.
  7. Drain the scallop and crab brine into the stock pot followed by 3 slices of ginger. Bring the stock to a low simmer.
  8. Heat up a few T of oil in a pan and pan fry the crab meat until most of its wetness has evaporated. Add one ladle of stock to the pan as a deglaze.
  9. Turn off the fire temporarily. Slowly drizzle the white of 2 eggs into the pot while stirring in a circular direction. Resume the simmer.
  10. Transfer the crab meat into the soup pot, followed by the diced carrots. Gently slide the beancurd from the plate into the pot. The beancurd is delicate so let gravity do the work.
  11. Wait for the soup to come to a simmer again. Mix 2T of corn starch with half a cup of cold water until the starch dissolves. Test with your fingers to make sure there are no lumps. Pour the starch mixture slowly into the pot while stirring gently. The soup will soon thicken.
  12. Bring the soup to a strong boil add the diced prawn and scallops, the asparagus and the mushrooms.
  13. In about 2 minutes when the asparagus has softened but is still crisp, turn off the heat. Stir in 1 flat t of white pepper. Add salt to taste and serve immediately.

 Making the Stock

  • The most common ingredient for boiling Chinese seafood stock is dried whole scallops (a.k.a. conpoy, pictured on the bottle label) but there are a variety of other cheaper alternatives to try such as cured whelk, conch and squid. I don’t suggest dried abalone for this purpose, as it is prohibitively expensive.
  • Do not use dried fish because the soup won’t taste good. The exception to this rule is small cured varieties like anchovy or smelt. Fresh fish can be used for the stock, but it should be fried until it is crispy first.
  • If you add the prawn heads to the stock you will get their extra flavour, but they will impart a reddish hue to the soup, which purists who expect a totally white soup will object to.
  • For the modern kitchen I recommend dried scallop granules (pictured, the whole bottle).  I usually use 1t of  per cup of water. Its convenient, cheaper but taste just as good. You can also use fish stock cubes, hon dashi granules or any combination of  everything mentioned above.
  • Remember to pour your stock through a strainer if there are loose bits.

 Notes

  • Timing is everything in this recipe. If you cook the prawn or scallop too long they will get rubbery. If you cook the carrots or asparagus too long they will get mushy but you want them crisp. So cut and marinate everything ahead of time and follow the sequence of the recipe.
  • Knife work is also important, you want all the components to be of the same size, like in a Olivier salad. The reason you cube the beancurd first is to know the size of one cube. Dice everything else, the prawn, scallop, carrots etc. to the same dimensions.
  • Frozen seafood is no problem for this recipe, just make sure you defrost everything ahead of time. If you are buying frozen prawns that are already shelled, reduce the weight used accordingly. 
  • There is more than one type of beancurd. Make sure you buy the type that is hard or after some cooking the beancurd might disintegrate when your stir.
  • If you don’t have any Chinese wine, just use sherry.
  • If you can’t find straw mushrooms, you can substitute another type but make sure you choose a light coloured variety. Oyster mushrooms are a good alternative.   
 
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Posted by on January 12, 2020 in Chinese, Oriental, Seafood, Soups

 

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Warm Duck Breast Salad with a Cranberry Dressing

(serves 4-5)
I just made this duck salad on Christmas eve and it is one of my favourite appetizers for the festive season; it’s got just the right amount of red, and green. Duck breast is surprisingly easy to prepare once you know the essential steps, perhaps easier than chicken breast even. Another thing I like about this recipe is the use of cranberry. We are used to having orange or red wine as the primary flavour that goes with duck and cranberry makes for a refreshing change. It is also a great ingredient for a salad dressing.   

Ingredients

  1. Duck Breasts (2, frozen)
  2. Baby Spinach (150g)
  3. Leek (1 cup, chopped)
  4. Cranberry Sauce
  5. Marmalade
  6. Mustard
  7. Balsamic Vinegar
  8. Liquid Smoke
  9. Salt
  10. Brown Sugar (soft)
  11. Brown Mushrooms (10)
  12. Cherry Tomatoes (10)

Preparation

  1. Defrost the duck breasts and brine in a solution of of 4 cups of water, 3T salt, 1T muscovado sugar for about 4 hours.
  2. After rinsing the duck breasts, Rub them with 2t of liquid smoke.
  3. Julienne the white portion of a stalk of leek until you have 1 cup.
  4. Using a sharp knife, scour the duck skin as shown. Do not cut all the way through the fat; if you can see the meat below, it’s too deep. Also, you should space the cuts in accordance with how you intend to slice the duck later. Here I’ve made my cuts two slices apart.
  5. Heat up a pan with a dash of oil and on low heat pan fry the duck breasts for 2 minutes. Only pan fry with the skin side down and move the breasts occasionally to make sure they don’t stick to the pan. The purpose here is to render as much duck fat as you can from the skin.
  6. Place the breasts on a lightly oiled baking pan with the skin facing up. Place the pan in an oven preheated to 175oC (350oF), for 12 minutes. I prefer to use the toaster oven which takes a bit longer, 15 min. If the breasts begin to shrink, this means they are done.
  7. Allow the meat to rest on the pan outside the oven.
  8. Saute the leeks in the duck fat in the pan until they become limp.
  9. Add 5 heaped t of cranberry sauce (ocean spray), 1 heaped t of marmalade, 1T balsamic vinegar, 2t mustard, 1 flat t of salt and 1/4 cup of water to the pan. Stir fry until the mixture comes to a boil. Then transfer it to a bowl. Pour the drippings from the pan into the bowl and mix well.
  10. Cut the duck breasts into slices, making sure some cuts are coincident with the cuts in the skin. The meat should be pink or you’ve over cooked the duck.
  11. Slice the mushrooms and cut each cherry tomato into 2. Arrange the baby spinach, tomatoes and mushroom slices into a bed on each plate.
  12. Arrange the duck slices on the salad and drench with the cranberry and leek sauce. Sprinkle with black pepper.

 Notes

  • Frozen duck breasts sometimes are already brined. Please check and if they are already brined, you can skip the relevant part. The same goes for the smoked.
  • The choice of salad components was made with Christmas colours in mind. You can really make the salad with whatever you like. A white plate would really complete the festive look.
  • I’ve found the safest way to score the skin properly is to use a sawing motion with a knife with small teeth, applying no downward pressure.
  • You can precook the duck breasts and leave them around for a few hours, but only slice the meat and and plate the salad at the last moment.  
 
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Posted by on December 28, 2019 in Appetizers, French, Poultry, Recipe, Red Meat, Salad

 

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Japanese Hamburg Steak

(serves 4)
The Hamburg Steak is the predecessor of the hamburger, before it was turned into a humble sandwich. That’s not to say the Hamburg Steak is simply a hamburger without a bun, for it has many more ingredients, for instance a gravy. In this sense you can think of the Hamburg Steak as a cross between a Salisbury Steak and Bangers & Mash. The city that the most people eat Hamburg steak is not Hamburg as you might expect, but Tokyo; in Japan every family restaurant will serve Hanbagu Steakey and it is cooked at home by every family. My recipe is based this delicious Japanese version of the Hamburg Steak. 

Ingredients

  1. Minced Beef (500g)
  2. Egg (1)
  3. Shallots (5)
  4. Milk (0.5 cup)
  5. Bread (2 slices)
  6. Onion (1)
  7. Oxo Beef cube (1)
  8. Mustard
  9. Worcestershire Sauce
  10. Miso
  11. Sherry
  12. Soya Sauce
  13. Butter

Preparation

 

  1. Leave 2 slices of bread exposed in the fridge overnight to dry out.
  2. Toast the bread on very low heat for 15 minutes to make them ultra crispy and then smash the bread with a mallet into crumbs (in a plastic bag).
  3. Peel and cut 5 shallots in half and julienne them into very thin slices. Peel and cut one onion in half and slice it into thick half rings. If the outmost layer of the onion is thin, you should discard it as it will get burnt before the rest of the onion softens.
  4. Pan fry the shallot slices in 3T of oil on a low flame until you notice a few pieces have turned brown (see picture). Turn off the heat and allow to cool (the shallots will darken further). After some time spoon the shallots and oil into a mixing bowl.
  5. Add one egg, 1/2 a cup of milk, 1T Worcestershire sauce, 1t soya sauce, 1t mustard, 1t salt to the mixing bowl and mix well. Stir in the bread crumbs. Next, add the ground beef followed by a sprinkle of 1t white pepper and fold until you get a homogenous mixture. Leave the beef to stand. Do not be concerned if there are any pieces of bread crumb visible.
  6. In the same pan, sauté the onion slices on low heat in 3T of oil until the onion begins to darken.
  7. Dissolve 1 Oxo beef cube and 1t of miso in 1 cup of boiling water. Add the stock to the pan with the onions. Follow up with 1T sherry, 1t sugar, 1t mustard and simmer until most of the water has boiled off and you are left with an onion gravy. Pour the onion gravy into a gravy boat or other vessel.
  8. Separate the ground beef into 4 equal parts with the end of a fork or spoon. Shape each portion into a ball in your hands, which you then flatten into a thick (1 – 1.5 inch) patty.
  9. Add oil to the pan (which you have cleaned) and heat up the pan. When the oil is sizzling hot, place the beef patties into the pan.
  10. Pan fry the beef patties for 6 minutes flipping them every minute or so. After the 6 minutes add 1/3 cup of water and cover – allow the beef to steam for a minute.
  11. Remove the cover and add a large knob of butter. Flip the hamburgs one last time. Turn up the heat. When most of the water has boiled off, plate the hamburgs and pour the pan’s residual liquid into the onion gravy. Spoon the gravy over the beef patties to complete your hamburg steak.

 Notes

  • The staple typically served with Hamburg Steak is steamed white rice or mashed potatoes, rarely fries and never bread.
  • Like other steaks, there will usually also be an assortment of cooked vegetables like carrots, egg plant, tomatoes or string beans. Many of these can be cooked together with the beef in the pan so plan accordingly. A sunny side up fried egg is also typical.
  • If you don’t like the idea of an onion gravy, Hamburg Steak is also be served with a variety of other sauces, like black pepper sauce, mushroom sauce or demi-glace sauce.
  • For the ‘cheeseburger’ version of the Hamburg, you don’t place a slice of cheese on the meat, but insert a block of cheese in the middle of the raw burger.  
  • The Hamburg Steak is supposed to be eaten well done, so don’t try to make them ‘medium’. In Japan they sometimes mix some minced pork with the beef and you definitely want to eat pork fully cooked. Even fully cooked the meat will remain tender and juicy because of the non-meat ingredients and the steaming, so there is no need to worry about your ‘burger’ becoming tough and hard unless you really overcook it a lot.
  • Do not substitute onion bits for the shallots. It won’t impart the right flavour to the beef. 
 
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Posted by on October 5, 2019 in Japanese, Main Courses, Recipe, Red Meat

 

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Chicken Kiev

(serves 6)
Chicken Kiev is the king of chicken breast dishes, the perfect fool proof way of preventing a chicken breast from getting dry. The breast meat is kept moist and juicy because it is stuffed with butter. And when the breast is cut open, the butter serves as a sauce for the dish. No one knows for sure where Chicken Kiev comes from except that it’s not from Kiev. The Russian restaurants seemed to have claimed ownership of this dish while others insist that it was originally a French dish called Cotelettes de Volaille. No matter, it tastes just as good.

Ingredients

  1. Big Chicken Breasts (6 halves)
  2. Butter (140g)
  3. Shallots (4)
  4. Bread (4 slices)
  5. Garlic (3t minced)
  6. Flour
  7. Eggs (2)
  8. Basil
  9. Mint Leaves
  10. Salt
  11. Brown Sugar
  12. Toothpicks

Preparation

  1. Begin by brining your chicken breasts overnight, for about 10 hours, in a solution of 3T Salt, 1T Brown Sugar and 4 cups of water. For details you can refer to this post.
  2. Place 4 slices of bread exposed in the fridge overnight to dry out.
  3. When the 10 hours are up, give the chicken breasts a quick rinse to end the brining process and keep them in the fridge until needed.
  4. Finely chop 4 shallots. Pan fry the shallot bits in 2T of oil on a low flame until you notice a few pieces have turned brown. Turn off the heat and allow to cool. In the meanwhile mince a few garlic cloves until you get 3 semi-heaped teaspoons of garlic.
  5. Put 140g of butter, that’s about two thirds of a block, in a bowl and cut the butter roughly into cubes. A pair of scissors is the best implement for this. Allow the butter to warm until it is soft, then fold in the minced garlic, shallots, 1T chopped mint and 1T of chopped basil. The butter should stay opaque and not be allowed to melt at any time. Spoon the herb butter onto a large sheet of cling film and roll it into a long rod. Keep the butter sausage in the fridge until it is needed.
  6. Toast the bread under very low heat so it doesn’t brown, until it is dry and crisp. Place the bread into a plastic bag and smash it into crumbs using a mallet.
  7. The next step is to cut a cavity into each breast. Start by drying the chicken with a tea towel. Plunge a pointed knife about two thirds of the way into a breast from the bigger end. Carefully scrape the tip of the knife along one side of the cavity a few times in a circular motion to enlarge it. Flip the knife over and do the same to the other side of the cavity. While you are doing this, take extra care at all times not to let the knife pierce out through the surface. At the same time you should do your best not to enlarge the opening.
  8. Cut the butter sausage into six cylinders. Do this while it is still in the cling film. Unwrap one cylinder of butter, halve it lengthwise and push both pieces into the cavity one after another, as far as they’ll go. Repeat the same procedure for the remaining breasts.
  9. Beat two eggs. Cut a one inch piece off the tip off each chicken breast. Dip these trimmings in the egg and after folding or rolling each piece, use them to plug up the openings. Secure each plug with a wooden toothpick. If you inadvertently punctured any of the breasts earlier, you can attempt to ‘repair’ the damage with toothpicks as well.
  10. Coat each breast in flour, taking care to cover every part of the breast, especially the area around the plug.
  11. Heat up a frying pan with some oil. Roll a breast in egg and then the breadcrumbs until it is nicely coated. Put the breast straight into frying pan. Pan fry for about a minute, making sure the entire surface is cooked. A pair of kitchen tongs will be helpful in achieving this. Control the fire to make sure the bread doesn’t get burnt. Leave the breast to rest on a wire tray inside a baking tray. Do the same for the remaining breasts, adding more oil to the pan for each new breast.
  12. Preheat your oven to 175oC (350oF). Place the tray of chicken into the hot over for 20 minutes, or until you notice the chicken begin to shrink.
  13. It’s best to serve the Chicken Kiev straight out of the oven. Sprinkle lightly with white pepper while the chicken is still on the baking tray. Remember to remove the toothpicks after plating.

 Notes

  • Purists will no doubt point out that the proper way to make Chicken Kiev would be to pulverize a butterflied chicken breast into a very thin schnitzel which is then rolled around a slab of butter. This method has its merits but is quite labour intensive. Should you ever choose to try it, you should season the chicken instead of brining it.   
  • Chicken breasts can be plump and roundish or elongated and you should buy the former. I find those from Denmark and Holland are very suitable for stuffing. If the breast is of the elongated type, it will be too flat, making the carving a proper cavity for the butter doubly difficult. 
  • Don’t expect a large amount of melted butter to gush out when you cut the chicken as some of the butter will be infused into the surrounding meat. If you desire more flowing butter, you can increase the amount of butter to a full block. But in order to do this the cavity has to large; maybe you can wait until you have had some practice at cutting cavities into chicken breast before attempting to use more butter. 
  • There is no ‘standard’ herb to use for the butter. You can substitute other herbs of your liking, or even add things like sautéed mushrooms to the butter. I even used a bacon onion dip once instead of butter and it tasted great.
  • If you have a large number of diners, it may be easier to just deep fry your Chicken Kiev in one go instead.  
 
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Posted by on August 21, 2019 in French, Main Courses, Poultry, Recipe

 

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Gratin Dauphinois

(serves 8)
Gratin Dauphinois, or as the French call it Gratin de Pommes à la dauphinoise, is the fine dining version of scalloped potatoes. It is a dish of layers upon layers of thinly sliced potatoes bathed in creamy savoury goodness. Perhaps Gratin Dauphinois is the crème de la crème of potatoes precisely because of the amount of cream and milk it incorporates. This explains why it beats all other potato dishes hands down even though there is nothing special about it ingredients, and its method of preparation is unremarkable. It goes without saying Gratin Dauphinois is something every decent cook should have in his repertoire.

Ingredients

  1. Waxy Potatoes (750g)
  2. Cream (200ml)
  3. Milk (200ml)
  4. Garlic (2t minced)
  5. Shallots (2)
  6. Parmigiano-Reggiano (40g)
  7. Butter
  8. Sherry
  9. Cumin
  10. Tarragon

Preparation

  1. Slice the potatoes. Each slice should be about 1/8 of an inch or 3mm thick. As its the waxy type of potatoes you can leave the skin on.
  2. Mince a few garlic cloves until you get 2 heaped teaspoons of garlic. Finely chop 2 shallots.
  3. Put 200ml of whipping cream and 200ml of milk in a pot together with the garlic and shallots. Add 1t salt, 1t cumin, and 1t tarragon and bring to a boil.
  4. Arrange the potato slices into the pot, vertically as best you can. Add 1T of sherry and simmer for ten minutes, stirring gently occasionally to nudge apart any slices stuck together. Then allow the pot to cool.
  5. In the meanwhile butter a 2 quart sized (i.e. holds 8 cups) casserole, preferably one with a cover. Preheat your oven to 175oC (350oF).
  6. When the pot has cooled and the liquid within has visibly thickened, layer the potatoes a slice at a time into the casserole dish using a table spoon. Ensure each slice is coated in cream and take care to minimize any empty spaces. Spoon any remaining sauce, there shouldn’t really be much left over, over the top.
  7. Cover the casserole and cook in the oven for 25 minutes. If you don’t have a proper cover, just use foil snugly crimped over the top edges of your casserole dish.
  8. In the meanwhile grate 40g of parmigiano-reggiano.
  9. Take the casserole out of the oven, but leave the oven on. Using a spatula, press down on the potatoes firmly to compress them. Sprinkle the grated cheese evenly over the potatoes. Return the casserole to the oven uncovered and bake for a further 15 minutes, or until you see a nice golden cheese crust.
  10. You may serve your gratin dauphinois in the casserole or in square cake-like blocks on the plate with the main dish.

 Notes

  • The boiling in the pot allows the cream and milk to interact with the starch of the potatoes, so it thickens before you begin layering. This is the only way the slices will be coated properly. If you are thinking to skip a step and arrange the raw potato slices in the casserole to do all the cooking in one shot in the oven, it won’t work. The potato slices will end up stacked together as if they weren’t sliced at all and all you end up with is boiled potatoes.
  • Also you can’t just pour the potatoes and cream from the pot into the casserole in one go. There will be too many gaps and all the liquid will end up at the bottom. 
  • Gruyere is the other cheese commonly used to top off this dish. You can also try a combination of both gruyere and parmigiano.
  • You can do most of the preparation of your Gratin Dauphinois ahead of time, up to the point you have baked the casserole the first time and compressed it. You can even keep the casserole in the fridge overnight. Continue with the cheese and final bake when it’s dinner time.
  • Although I’ve suggested waxy-type potatoes because they hold their structure better, if you decide to use starchy-type potatoes, remember to peel the potatoes before slicing them.
  • Pommes Dauphine is a deep fried cheese ball, a different thing altogether; just in case you got confused.
 
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Posted by on July 30, 2019 in French, Recipe

 

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Know Your Cake

This is my 20 page guide to cakes from around the world. The countries these cakes, pastries, pies and desserts come from include France of course, and Italy, Germany, Great Britain, Austria, Japan and America.  With it you’ll be able to name your cake and eat it too. With the guide they’ll be no more not knowing the name of the cake you just ate or wondering how you are ever going to order it again.  

Sample of one of the pages

The PDF was actually made for another of my blogs, but since it is related to food I thought it would fit right in here. Don’t expect anything too fancy or detailed; a lot of it is just cut and paste from here and there on the internet, but  it’s put together everything in one place and does the job.

Download PDF of  Kobi’s Cake Guide version 2.3

 
 

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Bananas Foster on French Toast

(serves 6)
Bananas Foster is a version of Cherries Jubilee using Bananas instead. It’s actually a very easy dessert to make, requiring little in the way of expertise or special ingredients, and it doesn’t take too much time either. In this recipe I’ve added French Toast to the line up; the two are a great together if you don’t like your desserts too sweet.  

Ingredients

  1. Bananas (500g)
  2. Bread (Half a Loaf)
  3. Eggs (2)
  4. Butter (100g)
  5. Dark Rum (1/4 cup)
  6. Sugar (3T)
  7. Golden Syrup
  8. Vanilla Ice Cream
  9. Powdered Cinnamon

Preparation

  1. Beat 2 eggs in a shallow dish.
  2. Cut two 1.5 inch thick slices of bread from a whole loaf and further cut each slice into three equal portions. Soak the bread, on both sides, in the dish until all the egg is gone. This will take several minutes.
  3. Melt 1T of butter in a pan. Pan fry the soaked bread on very low heat, flipping occasionally until the egg is fully cooked. Leave the resulting French Toast on a wire rack to cool.
  4. Place 100g of butter, 3T white sugar and 1/2 t of salt in the same pan. Dissolve the sugar in the butter under low heat.
  5. In the meanwhile quickly slice your bananas. Cut diagonally across the banana to get oval shaped slices. The slices should be 1/2 inch thick.
  6. When the sugar has fully dissolved, add the banana slices and turn up the heat.
  7. Stir fry gingerly. When the butter and bananas begin to darken, drizzle on 1T of golden syrup followed by a sprinkle of 1t of powdered cinnamon. Finally pour in 1/4 cup of dark rum.
  8. Continue to stir fry. Stop and turn off the fire when the sauce thickens sufficiently.
  9.  Arrange the French Toast on one big plate or many small plates. Pour the banana caramel mixture over the French Toast and top off with small scoops of vanilla ice cream.

 Notes

  • There are many varieties of banana, and the one that you choose is important as it will determine the texture of the dessert you end up making. In my opinion small is better than big.The standard Cavendish (i.e. the big ones on the left in the photo below) get mushy more easily when cooked. I find smaller varieties like the Emperor Banana tend to retain their structural integrity better under heat. You’ll have a better chance of finding them at a fruit store as opposed to a supermarket. In all cases, the bananas should be at the threshold of getting ripe and definitely not over ripe with black spots. 500g is 3 large or 8 small bananas.
  • To add some flair you can serve your Bananas Foster as a flambé. The best way to do this is to preheat the rum in a metal ladle directly over the fire at the stove. Tip the ladle such that the rum is about to spill onto the fire to ignite it. Pour the burning rum over the rest of the dish at the dining table. While this is entertaining, it does impair your ability to control the viscosity of the resulting sauce, so be aware of this.  
  • Banana liqueur is one of the traditional ingredients of Bananas Foster but I find it is superfluous, and besides you’ll end up with a bottle lying the house for years with little other use. It’s infinitely more important to add the pinch of salt which is left out in many recipes. If you do decide to add it, just add 2T to the rum.
  • Most recipes specify brown sugar. I don’t because it burns more easily and I find caramelizing white sugar actually works better in exchanging flavour between the bananas and the sauce. I believe that’s why I haven’t a need for banana liqueur. 
  • To my knowledge, Bananas Fosters was first created in New Orleans, which makes sense since there are plenty of banana plantations in the Caribbean.
 
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Posted by on May 3, 2019 in American, Desserts, Recipe

 

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